Despite Regional and Skill Gaps, Balanced Labor Market Projected for Registered Nursing in California

Projections by Healthforce Center at UCSF demonstrate a balanced labor market of registered nurses (RNs) in California.

“If there are shortages, they are regional, and they are for RNs with specific experience. We have plenty of new graduates now and projected,” said Healthforce Associate Director of Research Joanne Spetz.

Nursing Shortage Looms for San Francisco Bay Area, Central Valley and Central Coast of California

By Healthforce Center at UCSF Associate Director of Research Joanne Spetz, PhD

Some regions of California face nursing shortages, according to new Healthforce research. Substantial shortages are projected for the San Francisco Bay Area, Central Valley, and Central Coast regions, while surpluses may emerge in the Sacramento and Los Angeles regions. This is the first time regional projections have been created since 2007.

Slow But Steady: The Growing Numbers of Men Who Choose Nursing

CHCF Health Care Leadership Program fellow Sergio Camarillo, MBA, MS, RN, decided he wanted to be a physical therapist after he learned about the profession at a career day in high school. While taking prerequisite courses for physical therapy in college, he became friends with a man who planned a career in a different health care field: Nursing.

“At the time, that struck me as odd because I saw nursing as a predominately female profession,” Camarillo said.

Why is Nursing Leadership and Management Important?

As the health care system continues to undergo rapid change, the nature of nurses’ roles are changing as well, according to Healthforce faculty research. As the largest licensed health professional group in the US, nurses are four times more prevalent than physicians. They practice in nearly every setting of the health care system and many are poised to take on leadership roles.